Splash Math is a brilliant and innovative tool for parents to download during isolation but for UK adults, exactly what age is each grade aimed at?

The grading system used in America is different from the one that we have in the UK. It’s something we often hear in American movies and sitcoms but we rarely question it.

But with the current global pandemic sweeping the world and schools closed, more and more parents may begin to ask themselves this question. Especially if they download Splash Math for their kids to learn on.

What exactly is Splash Math?

Splash Math is a free app which allows kids from as young as four to keep up to speed on their numbers game.

The app is free in the main, although there are some packages you can buy if you want more in-depth work and the ability to develop plans and timetables.

Splash Math

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But for the main, it’s a useful tool for kids. Each time you complete an activity you unlock further challenges and so on.

It’s a pretty basic concept but one which Splash Math seems to have down to a tee. You can also pair the app with a Parent Connect app. This helps track progress and activity and can also be used to generate reports.

The problem, well, for UK parents, is which grade do you pick for your child?

Grades to ages in Splash Math explained

In the UK, a child who is between five and six is classed as being in Year One. However, in America, they would still be classed as being in Kindergarten.

So, we’ve broken it down for you to try and explain what grade you should select on Splash Math for your child.

Age American Grade UK Year
5-6 Kindergarten Year 1
6-7 First Grade Year 2
7-8 Second Grade Year 3
8-9 Third Grade Year 4
9-10 Fourth Grade Year 5
10-11 Fifth Grade Year 6
11-12 Sixth Grade (middle school) Year 7

 

Splash Math is an excellent tool and app if you want to keep your kids well on top of their maths game.

Hopefully knowing what grade to select from now on, will be a big boost for parents!

 

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